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Historical Tidbits
Historical Tidbits
Information from the Virginia Hanson Special Collections
When did Brigham Young visit Cache Valley?
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Most people with even a cursory knowledge of American history know something about Brigham Young: President of the LDS Church, Governor of Utah Territory, and the "Great Colonizer" (for his role in settling the mountain west). He held a vital role in the pioneer settlement of Cache Valley and encouraged its growth, saying "So far as I know, no other valley in this territory is equal to this."

After a careful perusal of a variety of sources, I can find that he visited at least 7 times:


  • 1855 - In the November 7, 1855 issue of the Deseret News we learn that he and others traveled to Cache Valley on an exploratory trip.

  • 1860, June - Brigham Young and others came to Cache Valley to witness the dramatic growth and settlement of the area, nearly 10% of the population of the entire territory! Young spoke in a bowery built on the south east corner of 100 West and Center.

  • 1863, August - Brigham Young and others spoke in a bowery (likely the same as 1860) and announced his feeling that there would someday be an LDS temple built in Logan.

  • 1869, June - Little is known about this visit, but he and others came and toured the Valley.

  • 1873, June - Although the Logan Tabernacle foundation was already begun, Brigham Young spoke on the need to construct a larger building. This meeting was held in a bowery constructed on the southeast corner of Tabernacle Square.

  • 1874, May - Brigham Young traveled north for a meeting in Franklin, Idaho to celebrate the completion of the railroad to that town. While enroute from Logan, the train jumped a track and he returned to Logan in a wagon. He also toured the church farm in southeastern Logan and announced plans for Brigham Young College.

  • 1877, May - While visiting the valley, he is remembered to have taken his grandson, George W. Thatcher, Jr. by the hand and said "Come on, Georgie, let's go pick a spot for the temple." The present site was selected and Young spoke to several crowds on the need to sacrifice to complete this temple.

If you are interested in learning more about any of these visits, please contact me.

~ Jason, Special Collections Librarian

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Past Tidbits

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Historic Photos
A collection of historic photos of Logan.

Photo Title Description
Logan Historic House
400 West 400 North
about 1976
The history of this historic house in Logan is unknown. If you know something about it, please let us know. The address is approximate and has not been verified.

Picture ID: 6L

Source: Community Development Photo Collection
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Online Resources
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World Vital Records
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Mayors of Logan

Russell F. Fjeldsted
33rd Mayor of Logan

Russell F. Fjeldsted Dates in Office: 1990-1994
Terms in Office: 1
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From Logan's History

1866

July 10 ~ A very high flag pole was erected as a means of communication for the community. It was placed on the southeast corner of the temple lot, near the corner of 100 north and 300 east. This was referred to as the Liberty Pole. A white flag meant that the residents were to be watchful and stand by in case of trouble. If a red flag ever flew, it meant danger and the men were to take their guns and gather immediately.