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Genealogy and Local History at the Virginia Hanson Special Collections
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Friday, 25 March 2011
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Logan Temple Deaths
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The Logan Temple is often looked at with enjoyment by members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS); however, there was some sadness that went into the construction of the landmark building. The May 18th and May 25th, 1880 issues of the Herald Journal newspaper tell the story of two men who died on February 17, 1880 during construction.

These men were working in Logan Canyon when an avalanche approached them. William (Billy) King (see picture on the right) attempted to "get on the crest of the slide by standing on the backs of his team." Nephi Osterholdt attempted to get to the opposite side of the creek. Both men failed in their attempts and were crushed by the onslaught of heavy snow.

Their loss was sorely felt by family and friends alike after the tragedy. William King, father of the deceased, was nearly beside himself with grief. He is quoted as saying in an old Scottish drawl, "My son Billy's a guid boy, but he's got a cauld bed tae nicht." Large groups of women and girls gathered, despite the cold weather, at the brow of the hill, hoping to see the searchers returning with the bodies of the deceased out of the canyon. All of this sadness didn't deter the community from continuing in their efforts to finish the temple. It was dedicated on May 17, 1884 by John Taylor, president of the LDS church.
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Posted By Logan Library - Logan History Blog at 1:39 PM
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Monday, 14 March 2011
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Federal Land Patent of Logan, Utah
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A recently examined document deserves some explanation and highlight on this blog.

Researching the document revealed that a federal land office was not established in Utah until 1869. Previous to that year private ownership of land in the valley was technically illegal and settlers were considered squatters on federal land. However, people had come by the hundreds and it had been necessary for the settlers to establish their own laws with respect to land ownership and transfer. Entire towns were founded under this territorial law system.

In March of 1867 the federal government began to establish laws which would lead to legal private ownership of land in Utah. When laws were in place, William Preston, second mayor of Logan, traveled to Salt Lake City to receive a federal land patent for the entire city. Logan was properly incorporated according to federal law by 1870, the patent was recorded with the Cache County probate judge, and individuals were then able to go and properly record their land ownership with the said judge.

Mayor Preston's actions were acknowledged with a certificate that left Washington, D.C. in September of 1872 and finally arrived in Logan in December 1872. The document previously mentioned is this certificate, and it reveals much about the early establishment of Logan, Utah.

[Select here for a better image of the patent.]

See the following sources:
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Posted By Logan Library - Logan History Blog at 3:24 PM
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